National Threatened Species Day: Good News About Rare Aussie Animals – Hope 103.2

National Threatened Species Day: Good News About Rare Aussie Animals

To celebrate National Threatened Species Day on September 7, here are three good news stories about some of our unique and endangered animals. 

Listen: Hear author Penny Jaye tell us how she stumbled upon the hopeful story of 'One Potoroo – A Story of Survival'

By Katrina RoeTuesday 7 Sep 2021Hope MorningsNews

Gilbert’s Potaroo
Gilbert's_potoroo Wikipedia

Source: Wikimedia

The Gilbert’s Potaroo is Australia’s rarest marsupial. It is estimated there are currently only 100–120 animals spread over several locations.

It is currently listed as “critically endangered”.

In 2015, a fire swept through Two People’s Bay in Western Australia and destroyed the last known natural habitat of this already endangered marsupial.

Only seven potaroos survived that fire and their story is told in a new picture book, One Potaroo – A Story of Survival by Penny Jaye.

Potaroos were first documented by scientists in 1841, but were thought to be extinct, Penny explained.

“They actually thought that these potoroos were no longer there, until the mid-nineties when a scientist doing some research on other animals actually captured one,” she said.

“It was like it was just back from the dead.

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“And that’s why I think it is so important that this animal is being conserved and looked after.

One Potoroo – A Story of Survival is published by CSIRO publishing and illustrated by Alicia Rogerson.

Platypuses return to Sydney’s Royal National Park after 50 year absence

Platypus trevor-mckinnon-8xaWc7DL4n8-unsplash

Source: Unsplash

Platypus exist nowhere else in the world other than Australia.

And they used to live right here in Sydney.

Scientists from NSW Uni, alongside WWF Australia, Taronga Zoo and NSW National Parks and Wildlife Services are working together to bring platypuses back to the Royal National Park – where they haven’t been seen for the past 50 years.

Listen: Professor Richard Kingsford from UNSW’s Centre for Ecosystem Science tells Katrina Roe about the plan to bring platypuses back to Sydney

Bandicoots return to Sturt National Park after 100 year absence

Bandicoot

Source: Wikimedia

After being locally extinct for more than 100 years, bandicoots have been returned to Sturt National Park, in the corner country.

Researchers from UNSW’s Centre for Ecosystem Science are hoping they can help to restore the desert ecosystem.

Listen: Professor Richard Kingsford from UNSW’s Centre for Ecosystem Science explains how bandicoots support the local ecosystem