Irresistible Church – Hope 103.2

Irresistible Church

Read Zechariah 8:23 23 This is what the Lord Almighty says: “In those days ten people from all languages and nations will take firm hold of one Jew by the hem of his robe and say, ‘Let us go with you, because we have heard that God is with you.’” (NIV) In many quarters of […]

By David ReayTuesday 2 Apr 2019LifeWords DevotionalsFaithReading Time: 2 minutes

Read Zechariah 8:23

23 This is what the Lord Almighty says: “In those days ten people from all languages and nations will take firm hold of one Jew by the hem of his robe and say, ‘Let us go with you, because we have heard that God is with you.’” (NIV)

In many quarters of society, the church is ‘on the nose’. Sometimes unfairly, sometimes very legitimately. This text speaks of a situation when it is quite the opposite. The people of God have a magnetic quality about them. People can see God at work and like what they see.

Tim Keller writes of something similar:

What would it look like for us to live so compellingly and lovingly in our neighborhoods, cities, and nations that if we were suddenly removed from the world, our non-believing neighbors would miss us terribly? What would it look like for Christians to become the first place people go for comfort when a life-altering diagnosis comes, when anxiety and depression hit, when a child goes astray, when a spouse files for divorce, or when a breadwinner loses a job?

What would it look like for Christians to become not only the best kind of friends, but the best kind of enemies, returning insults with kindness and persecution with prayers? What would it look like for Christians, en masse, to start loving and following the whole Jesus and the whole Scripture, the whole time, into the whole world?

If we think that mass evangelistic rallies or institutional resolutions or Bible-thumping proclamations are going to create this, we are sadly mistaken. Ultimately, the quality of our Christlike lives will be the cutting edge—everything else is subsidiary. If we want people ‘clutching at our robes’, we need to discover a new sort of humility and a paradoxical type of power.

Blessings
David Reay