60 Second Movie Review: The Big Sick – Hope 103.2

60 Second Movie Review: The Big Sick

The Big Sick is based loosely on the true story of how aspiring comedian Kumail Nanjiani met his wife, Emily Gordon (they co-wrote the screenplay). Nanjiani plays himself, an Americanised Pakistani Muslim who casually dates Emily (played by Zoe Kazan). Their different backgrounds lead them to break up, just before Emily goes into a medically […]

By Ben McEachenThursday 3 Aug 2017The Big PictureMoviesReading Time: 2 minutes

The Big Sick is based loosely on the true story of how aspiring comedian Kumail Nanjiani met his wife, Emily Gordon (they co-wrote the screenplay). Nanjiani plays himself, an Americanised Pakistani Muslim who casually dates Emily (played by Zoe Kazan). Their different backgrounds lead them to break up, just before Emily goes into a medically induced coma. Kumail becomes further involved with Emily when he begins to spend time with her worried parents (played by Holly Hunter and Ray Romano).

RATED: The Big Sick is rated M for coarse language and sexual references

AUDIENCE: Fans of adult romantic comedies such as When Harry Met Sally, Notting Hill, Date Night or Bridesmaids.

WHAT’S GOOD: Even though the romantic comedy genre has been done to death, The Big Sick manages to be a refreshing, funny and honest look at relationships, as well as at race and religion. Kumail and Emily aren’t hugely lovable, but they often embody the way that real people approach major life decisions. The thoughtlessness and foolishness of humans is on sharp display in The Big Sick, along with critique and comment about customs, traditions and manipulation of racial and religious backgrounds.

WHAT’S NOT: The swearing and adult concepts can be icky or full on, and many viewers will be turned off by it. As much as The Big Sick presents flaws with the dating culture of sex before marriage and keeping secrets to make yourself look “more attractive”, you might still feel those things are being promoted by this romantic comedy.

SPIRITUALLY SPEAKING: For me, some of the strongest lessons from The Big Sick came from how parents and children relate. Religion plays a huge part in Kumail’s home life – his Muslim parents want their kids to hold those same beliefs – but it’s imposed rather than discussed. Religion is routine rather than invigorating. As it served up adult laughs and observations to me, The Big Sick also inspired me to encourage real faith in others – through encouragement. Not enforcement. As much as I might want others (such as my wife and children) to share Christian faith, I can’t force them to do that. I shouldn’t want to, either, when Jesus himself didn’t overpower people to make them follow him.

RELEASE DATE: Now showing

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