God works in the Australian Navy - Hope 103.2

God works in the Australian Navy

Sydney Harbour will come alive with 38 warships and 16 tall ships for the International Fleet Review. The event commemorates the very first time the Royal Australian Navy entered Sydney Harbour, one hundred years ago.Television and radio journalist Mike Carlton is a naval history enthusiast.  His newest book, First Victory, 1914, documents the HMAS Sydney’s […]

By Katrina RoeThursday 3 Oct 2013Hope MorningsGuests and ArtistsReading Time: 2 minutes

Sydney Harbour will come alive with 38 warships and 16 tall ships for the International Fleet Review.


The event commemorates the very first time the Royal Australian Navy entered Sydney Harbour, one hundred years ago.

Television and radio journalist Mike Carlton is a naval history enthusiast.  His newest book, First Victory, 1914, documents the HMAS Sydney’s hunt for the German Raider, Emden at the beginning of World War 1.

“The navy actually saved Australia.  We’ve forgotten all this because it’s so long ago, but there was a big German threat to Australia in 1913/1914,” Mike Carlton told Hope Mornings.  “We got ourselves a navy and that deterred the German threat and literally saved the country,” he says.

Audio: Mike Carlton talks about the proud history of the Royal Australian Navy.

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The International Fleet Review is not only a celebration of naval history, it’s also a tribute to the men and women who serve in the navy today.

What’s life like in the Navy in 2013?

Chaplain Richard Quadrio recently left his job as a pastor in Sydney’s Northern Suburbs to take up a role as a Chaplain in the Royal Australian Navy.

He says serving in the Australian Defence Force is a great way to get out amongst the people. “I’m free just to minister to people and love them in the Lord Jesus.”

Audio - Richard Quadrio talks about being a Chaplain in the Royal Australian Navy

Richard Quadrio went out on HMAS Tobruk last year, when he experienced life at sea for the first time.  “If it’s a nice, calm day and the weather’s beautiful, it’s very pleasant.  If it’s Sea State 5 and it’s windy and howling, it’s rough.  I haven’t been seasick yet, which I’m very grateful for,” Richard says, “but when the weather gets bad enough they say there are two sorts of people: those who are seasick and those who lie.”

Chaplain Richard Quadrio of the Royal Australian Navy

Richard Quadrio says there are many challenges involved in life at sea, including being away from family for as long as six to nine months, living in cramped quarters and not being able to get off the ship.  “Even though you don’t work 24 hours a day, you’re at work 24 hours a day when you’re at sea.”

Navy life also has its rewards, especially for a Chaplain.  “In an environment that is looking at issues of life and death and trauma and these sorts of things, strangely the issues come up,” Richard says.  “What I find as a Chaplain is the best opportunities to talk about spiritual things come up at the least expected moment.”

Richard Quadrio encourages Hope 103.2 listeners to go along to the International Fleet Review to show their appreciation for what the sailors and officers do.

“It’s going to be absolutely spectacular!” he said.